Here’s What the ‘MOAB’ Would Do to Your City

On Thursday, the U.S. dropped the largest non-nuclear bomb in its arsenal in Afghanistan. A simulator shows the devastation it would wreak in a given U.S. city.

The High-Yield Detonation Effects simulator, or HYDESim, was developed specifically to show what U.S. military ordinance would do to American cities. The 21,000-pound GBU-43, or Massive Ordinance Air Blast (MOAB) weapon, which is also called the Mother of All Bombs, has a blast radius of roughly 1 mile in each direction, and the damage it does to densely populated American cities, like New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Philadelphia, is considerable.

Screenshot of MOAB blast radius on New York City, courtesy of HYDESim

In the HYDESim, you can type in an address, or latitude-longitude coordinates, to pick your target. Then you pick what kind of blast you want to simulate on that location. Since a MOAB carries a blast of about 0.011 kilotons according to veterans’ magazine Task and Purpose, we chose that as our designated blast. However, in the app, you can type in any number. For example, the B-83 nuclear bomb packs a 1,200-kiloton (1.2 megaton) punch. Here’s HYDESim’s guide on each level of destruction:

15 psi Complete destruction of reinforced concrete structures, such as skyscrapers, will occur within this ring. Between 7 psi and 15 psi, there will be severe to total damage to these types of structures.
7 psi Severe damage to complete destruction of reinforced concrete structures, such as skyscrapers, will occur within this ring.
5 psi Complete destruction of ordinary houses, and moderate to severe damage to reinforced concrete structures, will occur within this ring.
2 psi Severe damage to ordinary houses, and light to moderate damage to reinforced concrete structures, will occur within this ring.
1 psi Light damage to all structures, and light to moderate damage to ordinary houses, will occur within this ring.
0.25 psi Most glass surfaces, such as windows, will shatter within this ring, some with enough force to cause injury.

Here’s a video of the MOAB being tested in 2003:

 

Jamie Green is a contributor for the Resistance Report covering the Trump administration, and lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan.